Removals & Relocation Specialists

Tel: 0330 666 55 00

Man and Van in Burton

Burton's quality Man and Van Service

If you're looking for a Man with a Van in Burton then your search is over! Van Man Hire are proud to provide an expert, reliable Man and Van service to the people of Burton at prices way below that of the usual fee's charged by the bigger removal companies.

We specialise in house removals and office relocation. Our team of friendly, dedicated removers will use their expertise to relocate all your valuable possessions and make sure each and every item is moved safe, sound and secure to its rightful place in your new property.

House Removals

It doesn't matter whether you are moving items from just 1 bedroom in a flat or the entire contents of a 4 bedroom house with garage and garden furniture! Van Man Hire can help! Our domestic removal services cater for every need. Contact us today for your part or full house removal service.

Office Relocation

We help many commercial customers with their office moves. Whether you are moving from 1 room in a building to another area of the same building, or moving to completely new premises. We will assist you every step of the way, even down to the dismantling and reassembling of desks and other furniture, to packing away computers and setting them up in their new places. Whatever the level of service you require, we can help!

Removals Van

Your removal service will be completed in a choice of either our extra-long wheel based Mercedes Sprinter or our long wheel based Ford Transit Luton van with Tail Lift with a choice of between 1 and 6 professional removal staff. Our vans are all carpeted to ensure maximum safety to your items whilst in transport and fully insured. Each of our drivers have a minimum of 12 years' experience driving vans, along with bags of experience in the professional removers trade, so you can rest assured that all your belongings are in very safe and capable hands. You can take a look at some pictures of our vans here along with their dimensions to help you judge how many trips it may need to complete your removal work.

Removals Preparation

Like anything in life, preparation is the key and removals is no exception. There's a lot more to it than you think so please check out our Removals Preparation Guide for hints, tips and advice. Everything is covered from protecting your delicate items efficiently to prevent breakages in transit, covering floors to protect laminate flooring from scratches and snags to carpets, right down to what size boxes you need to be using for particular items.

Removal Packs and Boxes

We can't stress enough how important it is to have the correct type of boxes and an adequate amount of them for your removal day. We highly recommend these Discount Moving Packs which can be ordered from Teacrate Packaging, our recommended suppliers.

Man and Van Prices

Unlike the bigger removal companies, hiring a Man and Van service in Burton to complete your removal service works out a lot cheaper with savings around double and even triple the price you would have paid with the larger firms. Click the prices links from our menus for a detailed list of our pricing structure and then compare them with the bigger removal companies such as Pickford's and you will see straight away that using Van Man Hire is the best choice!

Burton's History

The Roman Ryknild Street ran diagonally through the later parish of Burton linking camps at Letocetum (Wall), near Lichfield, and Derventio (Little Chester), near Derby.

Between 666 and 669 Wilfrid, the pro-Roman bishop of York, exercised episcopal functions in Mercia, whose Christian king, Wulfhere, gave him land in various places on which he established monasteries. Burton was almost certainly one of the sites: the name Andresey given to an island in the river Trent near the parish church means 'Andrew's isle' and refers to a church there dedicated to St. Andrew. The island is associated with the legend of St Modwen or Modwenna, an Irish abbess. It is likely that any surviving religious house would have been destroyed during the Danish incursion into the area in the 874. Place names indicate Scandinavian influence, and several personal names of Scandinavian origin were still used in the area in the early 12th century. In 1003 a Benedictine abbey was established on a new site on the west bank of the Trent at Burton by Wulfric Spott, a thegn possibly descended from King Alfred. He was known to have been buried in the abbey cloister in 1010, alongside his wife.

Burton Abbey was mentioned in the Domesday book when it was said to control lands in Mickleover, Appleby Magna in Leicestershire, Winshill and Stapenhill in Staffordshire, Coton in the Elms, Caldwell and Ticknall. The monastery was the most important in Staffordshire and by the 1530s had the highest revenue. It is known that there were frequent Royal visits to the abbey, including those by William I, Henry II and Edward I. In the 12th and 13th centuries streets were laid out off the west side of High Street, the earliest being New Street which stretched from the abbey gates towards the line of the Roman road, Ryknild Street. Horninglow Street at the north end of High Street was part of a major east-west route using the bridge over the river.

A royal charter was granted on 12 April 1200 by King John to the Abbott to hold a market every Thursday in Burton. This charter was later renewed by King Henry III and King Edward IV. There used to be four fairs held a year for the trade of horses, cattle and produce, on Candlemas Day, April 5, Holy Thursday, and October 29 (the feast of St. Modwen), although as in other British towns this practice has now died out.

While Burton's great bridge over the Trent was in poor repair by the early 16th century it served as "a comen passage to and fro many countries to the grett releff and comfort of travellyng people", according to the abbot. The bridge was the site of two battles, first in 1322 when Edward III defeated the rebel Earl of Lancaster and also in 1643 when the Royalists captured the town during the First English Civil War.

William Paget, 1st Baron Paget was granted the lands at Burton Abbey in 1546 by Henry VIII and expanded the Manor House using materials from the abbey. The family's ownership was later confiscated after being implicated in a Catholic plot against Elizabeth I, but was restored to his descendent William Paget, 6th Baron Paget.

Under Henry VIII the abbey was dissolved in 1539, to be refounded in 1541 as a collegiate church for a dean (who had been the last abbot) and four prebendaries. It was again dissolved in 1545 and granted to Sir William Paget. Paget began planning to expand the Manor House within the abbey precincts, known to have existed since at least 1514, into a grand mansion. To provide the materials for this project, the old abbey buildings were to be cannibalised. There were major alterations to the house over the next three centuries. Sir William died in 1563. After his death, the Paget family was implicated in Catholic plots against Queen Elizabeth I, the manor house along with most of the family estates were confiscated, with the Manor House leased to Richard Almond in 1612. Parts of the abbey church may have been retained for parish use, however these were demolished and replaced by a new church in 171926. Some fragments remain of the chapter house nearby but little of the rest remains either. Two buildings were converted to residential use - a part known as the Manor House, and the former Infirmary. The Infirmary became known as The Abbey, and is now an Inn.

Local Information for Burton

Burton upon Trent, also known as Burton-on-Trent or simply Burton, is a town straddling the River Trent in the east of Staffordshire. The demonym for residents of the town is "Burtonian". Burton, which had an estimated population of 43,784 (2001 Census), lies within the National Forest.

Burton is best known for its brewing heritage, having been home to over a dozen breweries in its heyday. Beer is still brewed in the town. The town originally grew up around Burton on Trent Abbey, which was the most important religious centre in medieval Staffordshire. Burton Bridge also became an important crossing point of the Trent and was the site of two battles, first in 1322 when Edward II defeated the rebel Earl of Lancaster and also in 1643 when the royalists captured the town during the First English Civil War. Sir William Paget and his descendants were responsible for extending the manor house within the abbey grounds and facilitating the extension of the River Trent Navigation to Burton. Burton had grown into a busy market town by the early modern period.

There is some confusion as to whether Burton is in the West Midlands or the East Midlands, even though the entire urban centre is south-west of the River Dove, which forms the Derbyshire/Staffordshire boundary. Several factors contribute to the ambiguity of the town's status. The local vernacular shares more similarities with East Midlands English than West Midlands English; the town was formerly within the East Midlands Utility (electricity/gas) areas, and has Derby postcodes (DE13-DE15). However, it is served by the BBC Midlands (West Midlands) region, based in Birmingham and before consolidation exercises formed part of the ITV Central (West) region, again based in Birmingham.

The town is served by Burton-on-Trent railway station.

Removals from as little as £100!

* Professional, Friendly Service

* Large Carpeted Vans

* Trained, Uniformed Staff

* Fully Insured

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